On the Farm

Deviled eggs aren’t just for Easter

Jump to recipe: Colorful Deviled Eggs / French Onion Deviled Eggs / Lobster Deviled Eggs

Happy Spring, local lovers!!

I’m so glad you’re here. 🌻

I kicked off the season by heading home to see my family on the Texas homestead, which was full of blooming wildflowers, the first signs of a summer vegetable harvest and – best of all – this year’s baby goats! We got six on the farm this year and went with a Sound of Music naming theme for our four girls and two boys: Marta, Liesl, Friedrich, Kurt, Brigitta, Marta and Gretl. They are so precious and nothing says “spring on the farm” like little baby hops!

ANYWAY, baby goats were not the point of this post although they totally could be. While I was visiting my mom and I also dove headfirst into the Easter theme and made three amazing deviled egg recipes.

It’s not Easter anymore, but it is still spring and I’m taking a stand: deviled eggs aren’t just for Easter. Controversial, I know but it’s not like I’m suggesting we make Puppy Chow outside of the Christmas season. I’m not that crazy.

Eggs are such an affordable food all year round and deviled eggs served cold on a hot spring (or summer!) day hit the spot just as well as they do on Easter, I promise. So I wanted to share the three recipes we made this year – all amazing! – for you to keep in mind over the next few months. You can get as fancy or as basic as you want with these. Enjoy.

Jump to recipe: Colorful Deviled Eggs / French Onion Deviled Eggs / Lobster Deviled Eggs

Traditional (but colorful!) Deviled Eggs

Nothing wrong with a traditional deviled eggs and these came out so well! I’m extra so we dyed the whites Easter colors. This could work for any holiday! Think red, white and blue for Fourth of July, pink and blue for a gender reveal, etc. We actually used duck eggs for these – we have ducks on the farm. They are slightly bigger than chicken eggs and the whites are SO white, but of course any type of egg would work.

To dye them, just separate the yolk from the whites and soak them in a cup of cold water and 1 tablespoon of vinegar, mixed with a dye of your choice. The more food coloring you use and the longer you leave them in will determine how pigmented they are. These were left in, with a generous amount of food coloring, for about an hour!

First, hard boil and peel 12 eggs. Half and separate the yolks.

For the filling:

Mix 1/2 teaspoon vinegar, 2 teaspoons yellow mustard, 6 tablespoons mayo and 1/2 teaspoon sugar.

In a separate bowl, mash yolks until desired consistency. Add the mayonnaise mixture, 1/4 teaspoon salt and a tablespoon each of minced celery and white onion. Chop a little extra celery for the topping!

If you’re fancy, fill a pastry bag with the mixture and use it to fill the whites. If you’re like me, just use a small spoon. πŸ™‚

Top each egg with paprika and a little chunk of celery.

French Onion Deviled Eggs

These were absolutely the favorite of my mom, dad and my fiancΓ© LOVES them! They’re also so so easy.

First, hard boil and peel 12 eggs. Half and separate the yolks.

For the filling:

2 tablespoons mayonnaise, 6 tablespoons sour cream and 2 tablespoons onion soup mix (any kind but we like Lipton!)

Mix, mash yolks to desired consistency and add in the mixture. Then add 2 to 4 tablespoons minced white onion (we love onion so we go heavy) and combine.

If you’re fancy, fill a pastry bag with the mixture and use it to fill the whites. If you’re like me, just use a small spoon. πŸ™‚

Top each egg with a fried onion (we just buy at the store!) and some green onion.

Butter-and-wine Lobster Deviled Eggs

We decided to get super fancy with these and they were totally a hit! I know I’ve already given by “deviled eggs are a perfect summer snack” lecture but honestly what is more summery than lobster?

First, hard boil and peel 12 eggs. Half and separate the yolks.

Then, prepare your lobster. Cook 2, four ounce lobster tails in boiling water for 8 to 10 minutes – they will turn red. Rub them under cold water. When cool enough to handle, slice a slit down the takes and remove the meat. Pat dry and cut into 1/2-inch chunks.

Heat 2 tablespoons of butter and 1/2 cup of dry white wine (double if you did 2 tails!) in a saucepan. When it comes to a simmer, add the lobster and cook for four minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and chop. Save the liquid!

For the filling:

Mix 4 tablespoons softened butter with the yolks until desired consistency. Add 3 tablespoons mayo, 1 teaspoon mustard, 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 cup of the reserved lobster liquid. Mix. Stir in 1/2 cup of the chopped lobster.

If you’re fancy, fill a pastry bag with the mixture and use it to fill the whites. If you’re like me, just use a small spoon. πŸ™‚

Top with chopped green onion, a squirt of lemon juice and a piece of lobster!

Let me know which sounds the most “you” and if you make any! πŸ₯

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